Venue: The Trinity Arts Centre, Gainsborough

NB - from our September 2021 meeting onwards we intend to present 'Hybrid Lectures', in which live lectures in the Trinity Arts Centre will be streamed simultaneously by YouTube, for those who feel unable to attend in person. See details below each lecture listing.

 

LECTURES

 

1.40 pm, first Thursday of the month  - February to June and September to December

Note: no meetings in January, July and August 

2021

Summary of lectures for 2021 - for fuller details see below

February 4James RussellEric Ravilious: Life and Work

March 4Dr Ross KingThe Wild Men of the North: Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven

April 1Clare Ford-Wille -  The Passion of Christ in Art from Giotto to Stanley Spencer

May 6Andrew PrinceFrom Downtown to Gatsby: Jewellery and Fashion

June 3Brian StaterWhen Britain Clicked: Photography of the Swinging Sixties

September 2James BoltonAfter Miss Jekyll: English Gardens of the Late 20th and Early 21st Century

October 7Nicole MezeyThe Corsican Adventurer: Images of Napoleon

November 4Caroline KnightGrinling Gibbons: Carver to the Crown

December 2Barry VenningChristmas with Giles, Grandma and Family

  

October 7, 2021

Nicole MezeyMezey

Nicole studied Art History at the Universities of Sussex, York and Paris. She was Senior Lecturer at Queen's University until 2009, working primarily with adults, managing and teaching on both the Part-Time degree and Extra-Mural programmes and conducting annual, international study tours. She also established the Department of Art History, the first in the north of Ireland. Nicole now lives in central London and is a freelance lecturer, working for organisations including National Museums, the National Trust, Queen's University and private cultural bodies. She is a guide lecturer for tours and will shortly embark on her second lecture tour of New Zealand for The Arts Society and ADFAS in Australia. Her publications focus on adult education and the arts.

Today's lecture

The Corsican Adventurer: Images of Napoleon

Inspired by the 200th anniversary of the battle of Waterloo, this lecture examines competing images of Bonaparte by those who loved him, and those who did not. Napoleon, a master of self-publicity, used an array of great artists to create and disseminate an image of himself as a semi-divine leader; military inspiration, thoughtful statesman and omniscient Emperor. For the English, however, Bonaparte was the “bogey-man”, and caricaturists used scorn and laughter to spread defiance to the mass market This lecture considers the experiences on both sides of the military divide, in a war of the arts almost as fierce as that on the battlefields.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

November 4, 2021

 Caroline Knightknight

Architectural historian, trained at the Courtauld and specialising in 16th to 18th century English and Scottish architecture. Lecturer at the V&A on year courses and short courses, and lecturer for the Art Fund, and for the Royal Oak Foundation in the US. Researched and wrote a history of Kensington Palace. Contributed to a book on the Cecil family, and has written several articles on architectural and social history and the history of travel. Wrote London's Country Houses (2009). Contributed a chapter to a history of the Royal Academy (Yale, forthcoming).

Today's lecture

Grinling Gibbons: Carver to the Crown

Gibbons (1648-1721) came to England from the Netherlands, and developed a virtuoso style of carving, well suited to the Baroque interiors of late 17th century England. His limewood carvings with their festoons of fruit, flowers, fish and game embellished Windsor Castle, Hampton Court, and Kensington Palace, as well as country houses such as Petworth and Belton. His work was commissioned for public buildings and churches, and he also worked in marble, making church monuments. Two superb wood carvings are in the Victoria & Albert Museum: his Lace Cravat and the relief panel of The Stoning of Stephen.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

December 2, 2021

Barry Venningvenning

An historian of British art with a particular interest in the work of JMW Turner, on whom he has published widely, including the volume on Turner in Phaidon's Art & Ideas series, and several catalogue essays for exhibitions in the UK, Germany, Italy and Poland. He was the BBC's script consultant on Turner's Fighting Temeraire and has recently taken part (2013) in a BBC documentary called The Genius of Turner: Painting the Industrial Revolution. He has also published a study of John Constable's paintings. His interests and his teaching extend from medieval architecture to contemporary British art. He is currently Associate Lecturer with the Open University and lecturing on a freelance basis for The Arts Society, Christie's Education and other organisations.

Today's lecture

Christmas with Giles, Grandma and Family

For a great many members of The Arts Society, the cartoonist Carl Giles was as much a part of the festive season as the Christmas tree, crackers and the Queen's Speech. So popular were the Giles annuals as Christmas presents that they helped to make him Britain's best loved, most successful and wealthiest cartoonist. The talk looks at Giles's life and work with a particular emphasis on his seasonal cartoons, particularly those featuring Grandma and the Giles family. They include some of his funniest cartoons but, as the art historian William Feaver pointed out, they also demonstrate that he had few equals when it came to representing Britain in Winter.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 7366552022

Summary of lectures for 2022 - for fuller details see below

February 3 - Helen Ritchie - British Studio Potttery: A Concise History

March 3 - Sally Dormer - The Wilton Diptych: Kingship and Politics in late 14th Century England

April 7 - Steven Barrett - Anatomy of a Masterpiece: Bathers at Asnières by Georges Seurat

May 5 - Eileen Goulding - Understanding Aboriginal Culture

June 2 - Paul Rabbitts - A Concise History of our Great British Public Parks

September 1 - Christopher Garibaldi - Italian Art and Architecture of the Risorgimento

October 6 - Charlie Forman - One Westminster, Six Royal Palaces

November 3 - Shauna Isaac - How to Steal a Million

December 1 - Ghislaine Howard - The Cuisine of Art and the Art of Cuisine

 

 

February 3, 2022

Helen Ritchie Ritchie

Helen Ritchie is Curator of Modern Applied Arts at The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge. Recent exhibitions include Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio PotteryFlux: Parian Unpacked and Designers and Jewellery 1850-1940: Jewellery and Metalwork from The Fitzwilliam Museum, for which she wrote the accompanying catalogue. Helen is also the author of A Passionate Collector: Mrs Hull Grundy and Jewellery from the Harrogate Collection (2014). She studied at Trinity Hall, Cambridge and the University of the Arts London, and has worked at numerous institutions including the Royal Collection Trust, Christie's, Harrogate Museums and the British Museum. She is a Trustee of the Society of Jewellery Historians.

Today's Lecture

British Studio Potttery: A Concise History

An overview of the British Studio Pottery movement, exploring handmade pottery in Britain from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the present day, including the work of the Martin Brothers, Bernard Leach, Lucie Rie, Alison Britton and Grayson Perry.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

March 3, 2022

Sally Dormer Dormer

Lecturer and tutor for the Early Medieval Year Course at V&A. Dean of 'European Studies' for 2 US Universities. Freelance lecturer for The Art Fund. Study tours, cruises and tour groups. BA (History) University of Durham; PhD (Medieval Manuscript illumination) and MA (Medieval History of Art) Courtauld Institute.

Today's Lecture

The Wilton Diptych: Kingship and Politics in late 14th Century England

Now housed in London’s National Gallery, the Wilton Diptych is one of the most enigmatic and exquisite of surviving English panel paintings. It was almost certainly painted in 1395-7 for Richard II, King of England, who ascended the English throne in 1377, aged just eleven, and was deposed and murdered in 1399. No documentary evidence survives to prove who produced this devotional diptych, or when, where and why it was made. This lecture approaches the Wilton Diptych as a detective puzzle, and attempts to decode the painting’s complex layers of subtle meaning and to place it securely within its late 14th century context. 

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

April 7, 2022

Steven Barrett Barrett

BA(Hons) in Fine Art, Liverpool School of Art; MA in History of Art, Birkbeck College, London. Lecturer at the National Gallery since 2004. Has lectured on the history of European art and architecture at Somerset House, taught courses on art and architecture at London colleges (The City Literary Institute and Bishopsgate Institute) and is a regular gallery and museum guide for U3A. Steven is also a painter

Today's Lecture

Anatomy of a Masterpiece: Bathers at Asnières by Georges Seurat

Bathers at Asnières (1884, National Gallery, London) is one of the best-loved pictures in any British collection. It was painted by the Post-Impressionist artist Georges Seurat, then only twenty-four and brimming with ambition. It is an impressive, light-filled canvas showing Parisians at leisure by the river Seine. During the two years it took to complete, Seurat developed new colour theories and a novel technique - Pointillism - to capture the shimmering effects of sunlight on water, grass and in the air itself. This lecture looks at the painting in detail, explores Seurat's vision and ambition, his bold new ideas and contribution to the history of modern art. 

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

May 5, 2022

Eileen Goulding Goulding

Eileen has an MA from the Department of Archaeology at the University of London, is a published author and an authority on the ancient cultures of the world. She specialises in the History, Culture, Myths & Legends of the Ancient Worlds and is a keen Maritime Historian specialising in piracy in the Caribbean and the South Seas. She spends her time giving lectures to the Arts Society, on cruise ships and to various local organisations. Her first book “What Did the Poor Take with Them? “ is an academic treatise on Ancient Egyptian funerary goods, while her second book “Understanding Ancient Egypt” is a more accessible introduction to the subject. Eileen has recently featured as an Egyptologist in a documentary, Nefertari: The Life of an Egyptian Queen (full documentary) published on YouTube by the South African film producer Curtis Ryan Woodside during the summer 2020 covid lockdown.

Today's Lecture

Understanding Aboriginal Culture

The indigenous population of Australia occupied the land for over 60,000 years in relative isolation. Discover their ancient traditions and how they’ve adapted to modern times since the arrival of Captain Cook.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

 June 2, 2022

Paul Rabbitts Rabbts

Paul Rabbitts graduated at Sheffield with a BA Honours in Geography followed by a Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture at Edinburgh. He is a qualified landscape architect and celebrated park manager and has worked for several local authorities across the UK, currently Head of Parks, Heritage and Culture at Watford. He is a passionate advocate for public parks and in particular, the Victorian and Edwardian bandstand and is a prolific author on the subject. His first of now 25 books were published in 2011 on the iconic bandstand and was followed rapidly by books on the Royal Parks, Great British Parks and ‘Parkitecture’, Grinling Gibbons and Sir Christopher Wren. He has just completed the first full biography of Decimus Burton, Gentleman Architect, due in late 2021.  Now a UK leading expert on bandstands he has been asked to assist in localised restoration projects nationwide and has been a regular and popular speaker on bandstands and public parks for many years.

Today's Lecture

A Concise History of our Geat British Public Parks

This really is a fascinating insight into the history of one of our greatest ever institutions - our Great British Public Park. We have all enjoyed them at some time in our lives but what do we really know about them? What are their origins? This talk illustrates their origins from the great Royal Parks to the Pleasure Gardens of the eighteenth century, to their Victorian heyday. It discusses what makes a great park, it’s ‘parkitecture’ with examples of lodges, lakes, bandstands, fountains, lidos, palm houses and to their wonderful floral displays, to their great decline in the sixties, seventies and eighties. However, the subsequent revival has led to a major shift in interest in our parks and once again we are very much in love with them. This is a highly illustrative lecture accompanied by slides with examples of parks from across the UK and their designs and architecture and can be shaped to the locality of the lecture.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

September 1, 2022

Christopher Garibaldg`r

Independent Researcher. 2010–2019 Director of Palace House, Newmarket (National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art: www.palacehousenewmarket.co.uk). 2008–2010 Co-Director of the Attingham Summer School for the Study of Historic Houses and Collections. 1998–2003 Senior Curator & Assistant Keeper of Art (Decorative Art) at Norwich Castle Museum: co-curator of Flower Power – The Meaning of Flowers in Art and Eat, Drink and Be Merry, the British at Table 1600 to 2000. 1994–1997 Catalogued the silver in the Royal Collection at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and other royal residences.

Today's Lecture

Italian Art and Artchitecture of the Risorgimento

This lecture examines a sometimes overlooked area of Italian art, architecture and culture - the nineteenth century. It traces the most important works of art and architecture and looks at the way in which they echoed the growing sense of national identity during the period before, during and after Italian unification. It looks at particular artists such as Francesco Hayez whose paintings embodying a romantic medievalism often contain hidden allusions to Italy’s growing national consciousness. The lecture aims in some small way to prove that the story of Italian art did not end with the Renaissance or the Baroque.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

October 6, 2022

Charlie Forman for

As a London walking tour guide and lecturer, I highlight the social, architectural and artistic history of my home city. It is a city I am passionate about, not least because it has a historic core larger and richer than any other world city. A member of the City of Westminster Guide Lecturers Association, my talks focus on the forces that have shaped and changed this multi-faceted metropolis and the artistic and cultural heritage that this has given us. After many hundreds of walks and a four-decade long career in housing and regeneration I have absorbed a deep understanding and appreciation of the capital. I’ve had some fascinating vantage points like the seven years build-up to the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games where I played a role in channelling potential long-term benefits into surrounding East London communities. My publications include Spitalfields: A battle for land.

Today's Lecture 

One Westminster, Six Royal Palaces

Experience a thousand years of Westminster’s royal palaces. With just an occasional gap, monarchs have reigned from a Westminster base since the 1030s. This is a ‘walk-through’ of the six palaces that have been their home. Remarkably, only the first of these, the Palace of Westminster, was purpose built to house the monarch. Parliament still occupies that palace, but by 1530 the monarch had moved on to the largest palace in the Europe of its time - Whitehall. Almost burnt to the ground in the 1690s, the Banqueting House, jewel in its crown, is still with us today. That fire left the House of Hanover cramped up in St James’s palace for a century. It was not till the 1820s that George IV and two brothers commissioned a palace each by St James’s Park – alongside three existing palatial homes. This profligacy, led by that spendthrift-in-chief King George, did include his major upgrade to Buckingham House - still in service today. Despite much fire and one total demolition, the best elements of the other five are there to explore.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

November 3, 2022

Shauna Isaac isa

Shauna Isaac has been active in World War II art restitution for several years and has worked with families and government organisations to recover Nazi looted art. She set up the Central Registry on Looted Cultural Property and served as a member of the Working Group for the Holocaust Era Assets Conference in Prague. Shauna studied at the Courtauld Institute of Art in the UK and Smith College in the USA. She is a regular lecturer at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. Her publications include articles for The Art Newspaper, The Times Literary Supplement and Art Quarterly. She is a contributor to the book Insiders/Outsiders: Refuges from Nazi Europe and their contribution to British Visual Culture.

Today's Lecture

How to Steal a Million

We have all heard about audacious art heists that are more like blockbuster movies than run-of-the-mill burglaries. In this lecture, we are going to look at famous art thefts, discuss what motivates art thieves as well as examine what aspects the thefts have in common. We will also look at where the burglars made mistakes, which enabled investigators to swoop in and recover stolen masterpieces. In many cases, the police sting operations were just as daring as the thefts.

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655

December 1, 2022

Ghislaine Howard How

A painter of national reputation named as a Woman of The Year 2008 for her contribution to art and society. She has published and exhibited widely, had work in the Royal Collection and had solo exhibitions at many prestigious venues including Manchester Art Gallery, Canterbury Cathedral and Imperial War Museum North. An associate lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, she has lectured to a broad spectrum of people at her studio gallery or at more public venues such as cathedrals, art galleries and other institutions.

Today's Lecture

The Cuisine of Art and the Art of Cuisine

This lecture will be a feast for the eyes and tickle the taste buds, an inspiration for your cooking- and looking. It will feature the art, anecdotes and recipes of artists who loved their food. We will discuss Toulouse Lautrec, famous in his day for his truly fabulous meals and infamous cookbook, Renoir who introduced Paris to the pleasures of Provençal peasant cooking as well as Monet, Cézanne, Picasso and many others. We have prepared a special recipe booklet that can be posted on the internet- or bring a pen! 

Hybrid Lecture, with a presentation at the Trinity Arts Centre supplemented by live streaming via YouTube. If you wish to use this medium, please contact our Membership Secretary Barnaby Heywood at  barny.heywood@btinternet.com - or on 07779 023122; or  our Treasurer, Barbara Buckenham, at barb4buck@gmail.com - or on 07973 736655